Palm Sunday and Easter Traditions in Romania

Easter, or the Resurrection of Christ, is one of the most celebrated Christian holidays in the world. Each country has its own way of celebrating Easter, through different customs and Romania too has its own wealth of traditions waiting to be discovered. For those who decided to spend Easter in Romania, let’s take a glimpse into what Easter is for Romanians and how they celebrate it.

In Romania, many Easter traditions have been preserved. The celebrations start with Holy Week, usually held a week later than Catholic Holy week. This is because the Orthodox Church calculates the date for Easter using the Julian, rather than the Gregorian calendar. Despite the different date, it also begins with Palm Sunday (in Romanian Florii), when Jesus entered Jerusalem and ends with Easter Sunday, when Christ was resurrected. Easter Sunday is celebrated on April 15 this year.

During this week, final preparations are made for the big celebration. On Palm Sunday, people who attend mass in church return home with blessed willow branches and hang them on icons in the house. The Florii holiday is celebrated this year on April 8, when all those who have flower names and those called Florin or Florina celebrate their name day.

On Good Thursday, also called Holy Thursday, people take food and drink to the church. On the same day, boiled eggs are painted. Tradition holds that if eggs turn red on Holy Thursday, they will keep without spoiling all year. The prominent color for Easter eggs is red, but other colors like yellow, green or blue are also used.

Read full article at Romania Insider.

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