1 April: Fools Day

April 1 Fools Day is recognized as in most countries. Marked first in Europe, Fools Day emigrated overseas and then across the globe. The Fools Day pranks or being put on, or you become the fool. It is said that pranks must be made by noon because otherwise you will have bad luck all year.

Origins Fools Day, long disputed, have been found exactly, historians believing that the custom farces is a blend of local traditional customs of each country with ancient legends and ceremonies to welcome the New Year and then the spring.

It is argued that the origin of day on April 1 is closely related to changing the Julian calendar to the Gregorian. In the old calendar, New Year's Day was celebrated on April 1 instead of Jan. 1. After changing the Gregorian calendar in 1582, when Charles IX, people initially had problems to get used to celebrate the new year on January 1. Those who celebrated New Year on April 1 were called "April Fools'".

As time passes, sent New Year greetings on April 1 began to be considered pranks, often accompanied by humorous gifts.

In France, where Fools Day was marked for the first time in the sixteenth century, who falls victim to a hoax is called "poisson d'Avril" (April fish), according to Agerpres.

It should, according to tradition, to wear all day a paper taped to a pin on the back. The paper must either be cut in the shape of fish or fish have a drawing. However because in April, according to astrology, the Sun leaves the zodiac sign of "Fish '".

In England, Fools Day is marked for two days: the trick is called 'Noddy' "and must wear a tail attached to your trousers or skirt. In

Scotland it is called "April qowk" or '"Pril cuckoo" (cuckoo of April), because this is the first bird that heralds spring.

In Spain, the fool on April 1 are given the epithet of "goofy".

The Japanese celebrate the April 1 "Day dolls" or "day of joy to children", who gives the gift dolls.

Fools Day is celebrated in some Latin American countries - Peru, Mexico and Colombia, but on December 28, as "Dia de los inocentes" (on the naive). The same festival is marked in Belgium, where, however, is celebrated on April 1.

In Iran and in parts of India, Fools Day is the 13th day of New Year (Noruz).

In Romania, Fools of April 1 began to be practiced in the nineteenth century.

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