Superstitions

Superstitions: Do's & Don'ts in Romania

Even Bram Stoker, who dazed and confused a lot of people and continues to do so, makes a note in his famous novel ‘Dracula’ regarding the superstitious people inhabiting Transylvania. So clearly, we have a pattern here! We’d therefore like to give you a heads up on the matter, as you might come across some of these do's and don’ts.

Romania’s Own Valentine’s Day

Romania has it’s own equivalent of Valentine’s Day celebrated in early spring on February 24th - Dragobete, the name of the local counterpart of Roman God of Love, Cupid or the Greek God, Eros. Dragobete is the protector of love, joy and fertility. He’s Dacian name is believed to come from “trago” – meaning “he”, symbol of fertility, and “pede” – “legs. Today is a day of joy – young people spending it together, of love, young single man and women finding each other (the guys try to catch the girl they like and kiss her).

Christmas & New Year's Superstitions in Romania

  • Misletoe sprigs placed on Christmas and New Year's celebration table bring good luck.
  • It brings bad luck to wear new shoes on Christmas day.
  • A clear sky on Christmas day announces a fruitful year.
  • If it's windy on Christmas day it announces bad luck.
  • It's not good to knit, to sew and to wash clothes between Christmas and New Year.